NutriVals is a free database of Nutrition Facts.

Vitamin K

Vitamin K helps the blood to coagulate and it keeps healthy bones. Vitamin K, or naphthoquinone, is a fat-soluble vitamin: it can be accumulated in the body and therefore it is not necessary to take it regularly. Vitamin K is important for blood clotting and for the function of bone-forming proteins.

Dietary supplement

You can use a dietary supplement of Vitamin K if you think your diet lacks this nutrient.

As a biologically active form of vitamin K, K-2 is important for the formation of healthy, strong bone matrix.
Known as the "sunshine vitamin", Vitamin D3 helps maintain strong bones. Vitamins D & K work better when taken together.

Use the list below to check if your diet has enough Vitamin K intake.

Food high in Vitamin K

This list shows food that are top sources of Vitamin K and the quantity of Vitamin K in 100g of food

Vitamin K
RDA
0.102 mg
85%
0.0975 mg
81%
0.076 mg
63%
0.0628 mg
52%
0.043 mg
36%
0.0403 mg
34%
0.0341 mg
28%
0.033 mg
28%
0.0314 mg
26%
0.0312 mg
26%
0.0293 mg
24%
0.0248 mg
21%
0.0241 mg
20%
0.021 mg
18%
0.0198 mg
17%
0.0164 mg
14%
0.0155 mg
13%
0.0148 mg
12%
0.0134 mg
11%
0.0132 mg
11%
Food
Fruit Vegetables Meat Dairy Eggs Bread Superfood Legumes Cereals Nuts and Seeds Seafood Other Spices and Herbs
Macronutrients Carbohydrate Fat Protein Water Fiber
Vitamins Thiamin (B1) Riboflavin (B2) Niacin (B3) Pantothenic Acid (B5) Pyridoxine (B6) Folate (B9) Cobalamine (B12) Ascorbic Acid (C) Vitamin A Vitamin K Vitamin E Vitamin D
Minerals Calcium (Ca) Iron (Fe) Magnesium (Mg) Phosphorus (P) Potassium (K) Sodium (Na) Zinc (Zn) Copper (Cu) Manganese (Mn) Iodine (I) Selenium (Se) Fluoride (F)
Amino acids Arginine Histidine Lysine Aspartic Acid Glutamic Acid Serine Threonine Asparagine Glutamine Cysteine Selenocysteine Glycine Proline Alanine Isoleucine Leucine Methionine Phenylalanine Tryptophan Tyrosine Valine