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Protein

What are proteins?

Proteins are a type of macronutrient that is found in a variety of foods, including meat, fish, eggs, dairy products, and legumes. They are the building blocks of the body's tissues, and they are necessary for the growth, development, and repair of the body's cells. Proteins are made up of long chains of amino acids that are linked together by peptide bonds, and the sequence of amino acids in a protein determines its specific structure and function. There are 20 different amino acids that are commonly found in proteins, and they are classified as essential or non-essential based on whether the body can produce them on its own. Essential amino acids cannot be produced by the body and must be obtained from the diet, while non-essential amino acids can be produced by the body and are not typically considered to be nutritionally important. It is important to eat a balanced diet that includes a variety of different protein-rich foods in order to get all of the essential amino acids that the body needs.

Why we need proteins

We need proteins because they are essential for the growth, development, and repair of the body's tissues. They are also necessary for the production of hormones, enzymes, and other proteins that are involved in many of the body's metabolic reactions. Proteins are the building blocks of the body's tissues, and they are necessary for the synthesis of new proteins and the maintenance of healthy tissues. Some proteins are also involved in the transport of molecules in the body, such as oxygen and nutrients, and they are necessary for the proper functioning of the immune, nervous, and digestive systems. Without sufficient proteins, the body's systems cannot function properly and a person's health can be affected. It is important to eat a balanced diet that includes a variety of different protein-rich foods in order to get all of the nutrients that the body needs.

Where are proteins found?

Proteins are found in a variety of foods, including meats, eggs, dairy products, legumes, and grains. Different foods contain different proteins, and some foods are considered to be complete proteins because they contain all of the essential amino acids. It is important to eat a balanced diet that includes a variety of different protein-rich foods in order to get all of the essential amino acids that the body needs. In addition, proteins can also be taken in the form of supplements, such as protein powders and bars, which are available over the counter at most pharmacies and health food stores. However, it is generally recommended to get proteins from the diet rather than from supplements, as the body is better able to absorb and use the proteins from food.

Daily requirements

The daily requirements for proteins vary depending on a person's age, sex, and level of physical activity. The Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for proteins are the levels of intake that are sufficient to meet the nutritional needs of most healthy individuals. The RDAs for proteins are set by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine, and they are updated periodically as new information becomes available. The RDAs for proteins are generally expressed as a daily intake of the protein in grams (g) per kilogram (kg) of body weight. For example, the RDA for protein for adult men is 0.36 g per kg of body weight, while the RDA for protein for adult women is 0.45 g per kg of body weight. It is important to note that the RDAs are not intended to be used as targets for individual intake, but rather as a guide to help ensure that the population as a whole has enough protein.

Proteins deficiency

Protein deficiency, also known as protein-energy malnutrition, is a condition in which the body does not have enough protein to support its normal growth and development. This can occur when a person does not eat enough protein, or when the body is unable to use the protein properly. Some of the most common symptoms of protein deficiency include weight loss, fatigue, weakness, and muscle wasting. In severe cases, protein deficiency can lead to serious health conditions such as anemia, edema, and organ damage. Protein deficiency is typically treated by increasing the intake of protein-rich foods, such as meat, fish, eggs, and dairy products. It is important to avoid protein deficiency by eating a balanced diet that includes a variety of different protein-rich foods.

Can you get too much proteins?

It is possible to get too much of proteins. Consuming too many proteins can lead to a range of health problems, such as weight gain, kidney damage, and an increased risk of osteoporosis. It is important to follow the recommended daily intake for proteins and to eat a balanced diet that includes a variety of different protein-rich foods. In addition, it is important to choose lean proteins, such as chicken, fish, and tofu, over high-fat proteins, such as bacon and sausage, as they are generally more nutritious and provide more health benefits.

Should I get proteins supplements?

Whether or not to take protein supplements is a decision that should be made on an individual basis, in consultation with a healthcare provider. Protein supplements can be a useful addition to the diet for people who have difficulty getting enough protein from their diet, such as vegetarians, vegans, and older adults. Protein supplements can also be helpful for people who are trying to gain muscle mass or improve athletic performance, as they can provide the body with a convenient source of protein. However, it is generally recommended to get proteins from the diet rather than from supplements, as the body is better able to absorb and use the proteins from food. In addition, protein supplements can be expensive, and they may contain added ingredients that can be harmful if taken in excessive amounts.

Fun facts

The term "protein" was first used by the Swedish chemist Jöns Jacob Berzelius in the 19th century.

The first protein to be isolated was albumin, which was isolated from egg white by the French chemist Claude Berthollet in 1780.

The smallest protein in the human body is insulin, which is composed of only 51 amino acids.

The largest protein in the human body is titin, which is found in muscle and is composed of over 30,000 amino acids.

The human body contains about 50,000 different proteins, and each protein has a unique function in the body.

Dietary supplement

You can use a dietary supplement of Protein if you think your diet lacks this nutrient.

Whey Protein Isolates (WPI) are the purest form of whey protein that currently exists.
100% Real Whey Protein 1000 g-0
100% Real Whey Protein 1000 g

Use the list below to check if your diet has enough Protein intake.

Food high in Protein

This list shows food that are top sources of Protein and the quantity of Protein in 100g of food

Protein
RDA
75.2 g
150%
57 g
114%
28.4 g
57%
27.11 g
54%
26.2 g
52%
24.5 g
49%
22.4 g
45%
21.9 g
44%
21.2 g
42%
20.6 g
41%
20.5 g
41%
20.3 g
41%
19.7 g
39%
18.6 g
37%
16 g
32%
15.86 g
32%
14.1 g
28%
13.2 g
26%
11.2 g
22%

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Food
Fruit Vegetables Meat Dairy Eggs Bread Superfood Legumes Cereals Nuts and Seeds Seafood Other Spices and Herbs
Macronutrients Carbohydrate Fat Protein Water Fiber
Vitamins Thiamin (B1) Riboflavin (B2) Niacin (B3) Pantothenic Acid (B5) Pyridoxine (B6) Folate (B9) Cobalamine (B12) Ascorbic Acid (C) Vitamin A Vitamin K Vitamin E Vitamin D
Minerals Calcium (Ca) Iron (Fe) Magnesium (Mg) Phosphorus (P) Potassium (K) Sodium (Na) Zinc (Zn) Copper (Cu) Manganese (Mn) Iodine (I) Selenium (Se) Fluoride (F)
Amino acids Arginine Histidine Lysine Aspartic Acid Glutamic Acid Serine Threonine Asparagine Glutamine Cysteine Selenocysteine Glycine Proline Alanine Isoleucine Leucine Methionine Phenylalanine Tryptophan Tyrosine Valine