Don't focus on how much you eat. Focus on what you eat.
NutriVals is a free database of Nutrition Facts.

Meat

Meat is a good source of protein, vitamins, and minerals, and can be an important part of a healthy, balanced diet. However, it's important to choose lean cuts of meat and to limit your intake of processed meats like bacon, sausage, and deli meats, as they are high in saturated fat, sodium, and preservatives. Eating too much saturated fat can increase your risk of heart disease, while consuming large amounts of sodium can lead to high blood pressure and other health problems. It's best to eat a variety of different types of meat, including poultry, fish, and plant-based protein sources, to get the most nutritional benefit and to reduce your risk of chronic diseases. It's also important to balance your intake of meat with other healthy foods, like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Do we need to eat meat?

While meat can be a valuable part of a healthy, balanced diet, it's not necessary for everyone. Some people choose to avoid meat for ethical, environmental, or health reasons, and can get the nutrients they need from other sources. For example, plant-based protein sources like beans, lentils, and tofu can provide many of the same nutrients found in meat, and can be a good option for people who do not eat meat. It's important to talk to your doctor or a registered dietitian if you are considering removing meat from your diet to ensure that you are still getting all the nutrients you need. They can help you make a plan to meet your nutritional needs without consuming meat.

How much meat should we eat?

The amount of meat that you should eat depends on a few factors, including your age, sex, and level of physical activity. In general, adults should aim to eat about 150 grams of protein-rich foods per day, which can include meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and plant-based protein sources. However, it's always best to talk to your doctor or a registered dietitian to determine the right amount of meat for your individual needs. They can take into account your overall diet and lifestyle to help you make the best choices for your health. Additionally, it's important to choose lean cuts of meat and to limit your intake of processed meats, as they are high in saturated fat, sodium, and preservatives. Eating a variety of different protein sources can also help ensure that you get the most nutritional benefit. So, while it's important to eat a sufficient amount of protein, it's also important to choose healthy sources of protein, like lean meats and plant-based protein sources.

Benefits of meat

Meat can be a valuable part of a healthy, balanced diet. Some of the key benefits of meat on nutrition include:

  • Protein: Meat is a rich source of protein, which is essential for building and maintaining healthy muscles, bones, and organs.
  • Vitamins and minerals: Meat is a good source of vitamins and minerals, including vitamins B12 and B6, zinc, and iron.
  • Energy: The protein and other nutrients in meat can provide a source of energy to fuel your body.
  • Satiety: The protein and other nutrients in meat can help you feel full and satisfied after eating, which can support weight management.

However, it's important to choose lean cuts of meat and to limit your intake of processed meats, as they are high in saturated fat, sodium, and preservatives. Eating too much saturated fat can increase your risk of heart disease, while consuming large amounts of sodium can lead to high blood pressure and other health problems. So, while meat can be a nutritious part of your diet, it's important to choose healthy sources of meat and to balance your intake with other healthy foods.

Drawbacks of meat

While meat can be a nutritious part of a healthy, balanced diet, there are also some drawbacks to consider. Some of the potential drawbacks of meat on nutrition include:

  • Saturated fat: Many cuts of meat, especially fatty cuts and processed meats like bacon and sausage, are high in saturated fat. Consuming too much saturated fat can increase your risk of heart disease.
  • Sodium: Processed meats like bacon, sausage, and deli meats are often high in sodium, which can lead to high blood pressure and other health problems if consumed in large amounts.
  • Cholesterol: Some cuts of meat, especially fatty cuts and processed meats, are high in cholesterol, which can increase your risk of heart disease if consumed in large amounts.
  • Environmental impact: The production of meat, especially beef, can have a significant impact on the environment, including greenhouse gas emissions and deforestation.
  • Ethical concerns: Some people may have ethical concerns about the treatment of animals in the meat industry.

Overall, it's important to choose lean cuts of meat and to limit your intake of processed meats to minimize the potential drawbacks of meat on nutrition. Eating a variety of different protein sources, including plant-based protein sources, can also help ensure that you get the most nutritional benefit and reduce your risk of chronic diseases.

Average Nutrition Facts (100g)

RDA
Energy 203.6 kcal
851 kJ
10%
Water 64.64 g
65 ml
3%
Protein 22.04 g 44%
Fat 12.28 g 16%
Saturated 2 3.35 g (of recommended max) 17%
Monounsatured 3.7 g 9%
Polyunsatured 1.06 g 5%
Cholesterol 1 40 mg (of recommended max) 16%

1 A maximum of 250mg of cholesterol per day is recommended

2 A maximum of 20g of saturated fat per day is recommended

Minerals

Calcium (Ca) 19.2 mg 1%
Iron (Fe) 1.6 mg 9%
Magnesium (Mg) 23.02 mg 5%
Phosphorus (P) 204.8 mg 16%
Potassium (K) 305.8 mg 7%
Sodium (Na) 136.8 mg 6%
Zinc (Zn) 3.16 mg 29%
Copper (Cu) 0.09 mg 10%
Manganese (Mn) 0.01 mg 0%
Selenium (Se) 0.02 mg 36%
Fluoride (F) 0.01 mg 0%

Vitamins

Thiamin (B1) 0.24 mg 20%
Riboflavin (B2) 0.21 mg 16%
Niacin (B3) 6.37 mg 40%
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.74 mg 15%
Pyridoxine (B6) 0.37 mg 22%
Folate (B9) 0.01 mg 3%
Ascorbic acid (C) 0.12 mg 0%
Vitamin A 0.01 mg 1%
Vitamin E 0.16 mg 1%

Amino acids

Arginine 1.23 g
Histidine 0.67 g 96%
Lysine 1.68 g 80%
Aspartic acid 1.76 g
Glutamic acid 2.96 g
Serine 0.75 g
Threonine 0.82 g 78%
Cysteine 0.23 g
Glycine 1.09 g
Proline 0.87 g
Alanine 1.14 g
Isoleucine 0.93 g 66%
Leucine 1.52 g 56%
Methionine 0.52 g 50%
Phenylalanine 0.77 g 44%
Tryptophan 0.19 g 68%
Tyrosine 0.64 g
Valine 0.99 g 54%

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Food
Fruit Vegetables Meat Dairy Eggs Bread Superfood Legumes Cereals Nuts and Seeds Seafood Other Spices and Herbs
Macronutrients Carbohydrate Fat Protein Water Fiber
Vitamins Thiamin (B1) Riboflavin (B2) Niacin (B3) Pantothenic Acid (B5) Pyridoxine (B6) Folate (B9) Cobalamine (B12) Ascorbic Acid (C) Vitamin A Vitamin K Vitamin E Vitamin D
Minerals Calcium (Ca) Iron (Fe) Magnesium (Mg) Phosphorus (P) Potassium (K) Sodium (Na) Zinc (Zn) Copper (Cu) Manganese (Mn) Iodine (I) Selenium (Se) Fluoride (F)
Amino acids Arginine Histidine Lysine Aspartic Acid Glutamic Acid Serine Threonine Asparagine Glutamine Cysteine Selenocysteine Glycine Proline Alanine Isoleucine Leucine Methionine Phenylalanine Tryptophan Tyrosine Valine